June 10th, 2010

It Starts Saturday

Poll #1576667 How Do You Feel About The World Cup?

How Do You Feel About The World Cup

Yay! I've waited four years! It's going to be great!
2(3.1%)
Cool. I hope my team comes out on top.
6(9.4%)
I'll be watching it until my team gets eliminated.
4(6.2%)
Fuck me. It's going to ruin my pub for a month.
7(10.9%)
It's making me stock up on sex toys because my partner is going to be busy watching it for a month.
1(1.6%)
Who the fuck watches a game where people rarely score?
7(10.9%)
I don't care about the game, but I'll watch the cute players.
2(3.1%)
I am American. What is this World Cup thing you are talking about?
16(25.0%)
I'll place bets on it, but the game is dull and I won't watch.
1(1.6%)
I've got tickets!
0(0.0%)
The World Cup makes me wish the terrorists had won.
0(0.0%)
I'm so excited even reading this poll is making me masturbate.
3(4.7%)
Sports is an evil tool of the patriarchy.
8(12.5%)
Didn't The Blackhawks win this last night?
6(9.4%)
Soccer is socialism.
1(1.6%)

The Girl Who Played With Fire

Whoa - that's an ending I didn't expect.

The fact that I was at the English language book store for book 3 within five minutes of finishing this, should say all there is to say.

Once again the book works because Larson keeps the central mystery simple: Three people are murdered. All evidence points to one person - but that person could not possibly have committed the crime. How is this possible?

I love the twists and turns and what I really love is that it's now clear what this series is really about - family and what comes with it. It's the central theme of both of the first two books and I can't wait to see how it's explored in The Girl Who Kicked The Hornet's Nest.

Someone commented on an earlier post that there is some debate about whether or not this series is feminist. I'm going to argue it isn't. You can't have a feminist book where the strong central female character is so often completely helpless - and often helpless because of her own truly bizarre decisions.

Yes, the books are filled with men who hate women, but Lizbeth Salander is hardly full of love for the male sex either.

What it is is "humanist" because the central male characters are also helpless a good deal of the time, again because of their strange decisions. It's an argument that no matter how strong we are in some ways, in other ways we are all potential victims.

And, it's an argument to reach out for help when you need it, because if you try to stand alone, you really are playing with fire.

P.S. Rome Girl went to pick up The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo today in Italy and discovered that in Italian and Swedish it is called "Men Who Hate Women."

Given the story that's not a bad title, but hardly one that would sell well in English.